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Thread: Bead & Yarn Jig

  1. #1

    Default Bead & Yarn Jig

    My most successful jig of all time is probably the simplest and easiest jig to make. It may also be the least attactive. However you can't deny the jigs ability to catch fish (esp hatchery fish).
    Here is a quick how to. This can all be done without any tying materials, experience, etc... I used a vise at one point out of ease but you don't really need one.

    First: you need, a jig hook with no collar, yarn, piece of monofilamet, super glue, scissors, two beads. I use beads called Egg Headz from troutbeads because they're already predrilled. I regularly use the light roe, dark roe and blood roe colors.

    Slide both beads on to the hook all the way to the head of the jig. Take a small piece of mono (12inches), fold it in half and shove both tag ends through the lower end of the beads. Cut a piece of yarn to a couple inches in length. You'll get a feel for how much you need as you do it more often.

    Next, put the yarn through the loop made by the mono. make sure to center the yarn.

    Once the yarn is in the desired location, carefully but firmly pull the tag ends of the mono until you pull the yarn up under the beads. Stop as the yarn reaches the head of the jig without coming out the other end of the beads.

    The next step is to slightly slide the second bead back just a 1/16th of an inch or so ( not very much). This will allow you to put a drop or two of super glue in between the two beads. The glue should immediately wick under the beads. As soon as you do this, slide the bead back up to the top one before the glue hardens and you can't move the bead. Still having the mono in place makes this easier. Next, grab one end of the mono and pull it out completely from the jig. Now add a couple drops of glue to the junction of the jig head and the first bead. Again, the glue should wick up under the beads without any trouble.

    The last thing to do will be to trim your yarn tail depending on how much yarn you used. I generally trim it so the yarn is flush with the hook bend or just slightly past.
    All done and ready to fish.

    Color choices are endless. Bead colors can be as you like. you can paint the head any color you like. Yarn color of your choice. You can even tear a yarn strand in half and blend a couple colors. Go wild, but the jig shown is my all time producer. no paint, orange/red beads, pink yarn. Fished often with shrimp. The best scent I know of is the stinky water that collects at the bottom of the container that you purchased your shrimp in.


    Sam

  2. Default

    Thanks for the tutorial! I always wondered how jigs were tied with palmered schlappen or hackle with beads. Looks like that same technique would work for feathers.

    I am going to try that jig out this winter. Different yarn of course.

  3. #3

    Default

    You can still palmer feathers right up to the beads. The only variation would be to pull yarn that is short enough that it fits underneath the jigs completely (none hanging out) then you can palmer right up to the solid beads.

  4. #4

    Default

    I'll be making some of those! That's more my style, I suck at tying jigs with feathers! Thanks for the info, that's another weapon I'll be adding to my arsenal!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Portland
    Posts
    288

    Default

    The tutorial is well done. Marabou feathers can be pulled through the beads the same way. No need to palmer them.

    Beaver Believer



    1. Powder paint the jig head.
    2. Slip on 2 beads.
    3. Wrap a kevlar thread base behind the head.
    4. Thread 2 marabou feathers through the beads.
    5. Tie down the feathers behing the head and whip finish the thread.
    6. Push the beads up the the head.
    7. Zap a Gap the beads.

  6. #6

    Default

    So do you just trim the maribou down to the desired size, then slide it into the beads? Also what is Zap a Gap? That Jig looks great btw!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Portland
    Posts
    288

    Default

    Thanks. I trim off the thick butt stem but leave it a little long. Then pull it through the beads and size it up and trim it off again before tying it down. This is much more solid and less bulky than tying them in behind the beads. I did it that way at first but cut them apart and retied them when I learned of this technique. Zap a Gap is a waterproof super glue. Fly shops carry it and maybe craft shops. Do you know about powder paint? It is very cool. You simply heat the lead head for a few seconds over a flame and then dip it in the powder. I purchased a few colors at Great American Tackle in Clackamas. The colors can be mixed to create an array of colors. I'm having fun with this. I am a fly fisherman but I am going on a float trip next week and the guide is bring a center pin outfit to fish a float and jig while floating between runs where we will swing flies. After that, I may have to take up center pinning as well.
    Last edited by Dillon; 11-21-2011 at 06:53 PM.

  8. Default

    I know Mike at Oregon Rod Reel and Tackle just got some of R&B power paint that they use on a lot of their spinners and spoons! Looks pretty cool.

  9. #9

    Default

    Nice job. Ive been doing this for years and doing a little experimenting myself. Sometimes I through in a little flash-a-boo or something smiler. And sometimes leaving it longer as a tail. Also sometimes feathering the yarn to taper out.
    Ricky
    Quote Originally Posted by samdinger View Post
    My most successful jig of all time is probably the simplest and easiest jig to make. It may also be the least attactive. However you can't deny the jigs ability to catch fish (esp hatchery fish).
    Here is a quick how to. This can all be done without any tying materials, experience, etc... I used a vise at one point out of ease but you don't really need one.

    First: you need, a jig hook with no collar, yarn, piece of monofilamet, super glue, scissors, two beads. I use beads called Egg Headz from troutbeads because they're already predrilled. I regularly use the light roe, dark roe and blood roe colors.

    Slide both beads on to the hook all the way to the head of the jig. Take a small piece of mono (12inches), fold it in half and shove both tag ends through the lower end of the beads. Cut a piece of yarn to a couple inches in length. You'll get a feel for how much you need as you do it more often.

    Next, put the yarn through the loop made by the mono. make sure to center the yarn.

    Once the yarn is in the desired location, carefully but firmly pull the tag ends of the mono until you pull the yarn up under the beads. Stop as the yarn reaches the head of the jig without coming out the other end of the beads.

    The next step is to slightly slide the second bead back just a 1/16th of an inch or so ( not very much). This will allow you to put a drop or two of super glue in between the two beads. The glue should immediately wick under the beads. As soon as you do this, slide the bead back up to the top one before the glue hardens and you can't move the bead. Still having the mono in place makes this easier. Next, grab one end of the mono and pull it out completely from the jig. Now add a couple drops of glue to the junction of the jig head and the first bead. Again, the glue should wick up under the beads without any trouble.

    The last thing to do will be to trim your yarn tail depending on how much yarn you used. I generally trim it so the yarn is flush with the hook bend or just slightly past.
    All done and ready to fish.

    Color choices are endless. Bead colors can be as you like. you can paint the head any color you like. Yarn color of your choice. You can even tear a yarn strand in half and blend a couple colors. Go wild, but the jig shown is my all time producer. no paint, orange/red beads, pink yarn. Fished often with shrimp. The best scent I know of is the stinky water that collects at the bottom of the container that you purchased your shrimp in.


    Sam
    Fishing is always good but catching is a different story

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    gresham, oregon
    Posts
    1,296

    Default

    Nice thing about those is if you had the jig heads with you, they could even be tied stream side. That was a great tutorial and super easy.

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