Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 18

Thread: Cleaned the dust of my spinner making stuff tonight...

  1. #1

    Default Cleaned the dust of my spinner making stuff tonight...

    I got out my spinner making stuff tonight and discovered just how rusty I am at making spinners , so here's a couple of questions for you experts:

    I appear to have been using a #3 clevis on my #4 french blades -- was that a mistake or is that correct?

    How critical is it that the blade extend down and cover the eye of the hook?
    "Carpe Pisces"

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    on the river
    Posts
    3,533

    Default

    As a generality, when the blade extends to the eye it means that it is capable of creating enough lift to run those components (diameter, and binding aside). There are obviously exceptions both directions. For a standard steelhead type casting spinner, shoot for it or close.

    For the clevis - slide the clevis on the blade and onto the wire shaft. now hold the blade at 90 degrees from the shaft. You want the remainder of the void inside the clevis to be approx 50% (meaning the "meat" above the hole on the blade does not take over half the distance). This way when at a reasonably acute running angle there will be no binding (thus less line twist and better running).
    Tolerances change from batch to batch of blades I get, sometimes I have to go as low as 2 on #4 blades.
    "Chuck Norris talks in the fourth person"

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    17 pulls
    Posts
    3,329
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Osmosis View Post
    Tolerances change from batch to batch of blades I get, sometimes I have to go as low as 2 on #4 blades.
    Ive noticed the same thing! Especially when I order bulk from Pen-Tac every now and then. they have a #4 thats the same size as Robs #4.5, and its .032 stamped out of a solid chunk of brass. Heavy little suckers. But I like em for the most part, 'cept for the holes can be off in the "inch" range. Like .075 or more! Thats better than a 1/16 of an inch.

    Ive got a whole box of new hardware to throw! I too, busted out the pliers, and wires, and hit the bench!
    Any pics of what suits your fancy at the moment?
    Dinger Jigs
    Lamiglas
    Costa Del Mar

    Hostess OG Pro-Staff
    B-Squad!
    Yes, they eat eggs... No. You're WRONG!!!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    on the river
    Posts
    3,533

    Default

    I run a bunch of similarly heavy blades, but use alot of .25-.27 blades too as that tiny shift in weight keeps a few more in the box instead of on the granite groupers.

    Camera is in the gear bag in the car for tomorrow so I'll have to grab pics sometime.
    I just had arts and crafts time with prism and some dodgers for my kokanee and ocean coho stuff!

    Just wait till you get a bag of 1k and the eyes aren't even centered! Quick way to get ****ed .
    "Chuck Norris talks in the fourth person"

  5. #5

    Default

    Thanks for the help. It's coming back to me now. Just organized my supplies. How is it possible that I can have hundreds of dollars worth of spinner stuff and still end up being out of something?
    "Carpe Pisces"

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    North Portland
    Posts
    306

    Default

    been making spinners, and having good results, the other day I went 2 for 3 on them with springers, but reading this post I realize that I have a ton to learn. Thanks Alan, for the good info.

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Osmosis View Post
    As a generality, when the blade extends to the eye it means that it is capable of creating enough lift to run those components (diameter, and binding aside). There are obviously exceptions both directions. For a standard steelhead type casting spinner, shoot for it or close.

    For the clevis - slide the clevis on the blade and onto the wire shaft. now hold the blade at 90 degrees from the shaft. You want the remainder of the void inside the clevis to be approx 50% (meaning the "meat" above the hole on the blade does not take over half the distance). This way when at a reasonably acute running angle there will be no binding (thus less line twist and better running).
    Tolerances change from batch to batch of blades I get, sometimes I have to go as low as 2 on #4 blades.
    I didn't think the tolerances on the blades varied all that much...until today -- you were right!
    I spent some time at the "spinner bench" this morning building my arsenal.
    "Carpe Pisces"

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    4,347

    Default

    cup depth matters too. the deep cup blades thump really hard down in the water, drives nooks crazy! I think thats why the #5 vibrax is always a good commercial go to. Throwing spinners this year that are a mix of various brands, r&b blades still seem to be a good producer. I need some of his torpedo bodies and 4.5 blades right now.......
    C. Winterwolf ><,> NWFI Community Director <,><


    Golden Stone Web Design


    One t0 MaNy cArp's 0n tHe braIn "2017"~<)))><


    One t0 MaNy cArp's 0n tHe braIn "2016"~<)))><

    Fighting over the fish will only serve to divert us from our common goal ><,>

    "The more I see the less I know" Anthony Bourdain

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    on the river
    Posts
    3,533

    Default

    As a fellow machinist you just wanted to have faith in the manufacturing process, I get it. Problem is that fishermen aren't always the brightest bulbs and seems manufacturers have a healthy mix of the brightest and most dim of the spectrum.

    Cup shape certainly plays a giant role, people get sick of me harping about it.
    Again like clevis punch out placement, not all of the same type of blades are created equal from batch to batch. Metal inconsistency and die inconsistency are rampant.
    "Chuck Norris talks in the fourth person"

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Osmosis View Post
    As a fellow machinist you just wanted to have faith in the manufacturing process, I get it. Problem is that fishermen aren't always the brightest bulbs and seems manufacturers have a healthy mix of the brightest and most dim of the spectrum.
    Such an attitude! You just managed to insult machinists, fishermen and manufacturers!!
    "Carpe Pisces"

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •