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Thread: Six Dollar Sand Spike Rod Holder

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  1. #1
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    Lightbulb Six Dollar Sand Spike Rod Holder

    SIX (6) dollar sand spike rod holder. Why? Because you decided you wanted to plunk for salmon or a friend invited you to fish for sturgeon from the bank of the river. Bring a rod holder, they said. You looked them up and found out that they cost $30.00. Now the how! I found several videos on Youtube that tell how to make various sand spikes but this one popped out because the cost is ridiculous cheap and can be tailored to your specific rod since your making it. Just a few nuts and bolts, and light duty fence post, and a short length of 2 inch PVC is all it takes. All of these items can be found at the Home Depot for about $6.00. Tools you need are a drill, 1/4 inch drill bit and a hack saw to cut the PVC and lastly pliers to tighten the locking nut. I used 1/4 inch nylon lock nuts and stainless bolts. Make sure that you leave some of the spike showing above the upper tube in case you need to hammer the spike in to more solid ground. Also you can cut the top tube section to function as open as shown in the video. I'M going try both ways starting with a closed upper tube. I built this spike to plunk for sturgeon along the Willamette river but you can use it for salmon and steelhead or any type of surf fishing as well. You can make this with one single longer tube near the top or you can make it with 2 shorter lengths as I have depending on what best suits your needs and the rod your planning to use. The single tube method is best for spinning rods while the 2 section plan works well for casting rods since you can adjust the sections to fit the rod better. The upper bolt can be a flat top carriage bolt so it doesn't cause problems with the rod sliding in and out. On my rod this acted as a sort of "snuggy" that holds the rod nicely when properly seated. When completed this rod holder is very sturdy and will last for years of heavy use and weighs only about 2 lbs. I will likely be playing around with the designs over the years so I will post any changes I make or details I figure out while on the water this winter and can determine what changes if any need to be made. If you make one, please share your photos. Good luck! ><,>





    Top section open' design with shock cord rod catch




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  2. #2
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    I make one that is very similar to this but I've found that using aluminum angle material makes the finished product much lighter if you have to carry it any distance.
    -Ken

    Two fish swim into a concrete wall... One looks to the other and says " Dam!"

  3. #3
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    where would someone get that Ken?
    C. Winterwolf ><,> NWFI Community Director <,><


    Golden Stone Web Design


    One t0 MaNy cArp's 0n tHe braIn "2017"~<)))><


    One t0 MaNy cArp's 0n tHe braIn "2016"~<)))><

    Fighting over the fish will only serve to divert us from our common goal ><,>

    "The more I see the less I know" Anthony Bourdain

  4. #4
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    Very nice looking finished product.

    I use angle iron, and Rebar both. I get it at the place called RSC in Clackamas.
    The post may offer better place to drive into the ground with a mallet though. I bolted a railroad tie to the top of mine for a place to hit with the hammer.

    The angle iron sucks at Bonneville compared to the rebar, and the rebar sucks in the sand compared to the angle iron. I think the fence post might be a really good middle ground.

    Like you mentioned, I like the U shape upper PVC so you can couple removal with a "hook set" or at least keeping everything tight.
    "Chuck Norris talks in the fourth person"

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by spactrukn View Post
    I make one that is very similar to this but I've found that using aluminum angle material makes the finished product much lighter if you have to carry it any distance.

    Home Depot.
    -Ken

    Two fish swim into a concrete wall... One looks to the other and says " Dam!"

  6. #6
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    I think Alan is right, I am gonna open the top. Not for the hook set but so it doesn't get jammed in the holder while under stress.
    C. Winterwolf ><,> NWFI Community Director <,><


    Golden Stone Web Design


    One t0 MaNy cArp's 0n tHe braIn "2017"~<)))><


    One t0 MaNy cArp's 0n tHe braIn "2016"~<)))><

    Fighting over the fish will only serve to divert us from our common goal ><,>

    "The more I see the less I know" Anthony Bourdain

  7. #7
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    Awesome! Looks like yours turned out really well!

    I saw this video last spring and used his instruction to make a couple of these for plunking the beach, I've got two and they work great. You do have to stake them in fairly deep to get it set (it will flex a little under a lot of load), but after one season of using them I didn't seem to have any issues with them at all. I haven't used them in rock, but I think in mud and sand they work great. A mallet does help to stake them in, but I never really needed one - just point the post at the angle you want your rod to sit and work the post up and down while applying steady pressure and it usually goes in just fine (in sand).

    Honestly I've got a nice angle iron holder as well, and although not as light/sturdy as the aluminum, the u-post is a great middle ground holder - and is lighter than the angle iron. Plus its easier to work with, since it has the already pre-made holes. Although the $30 holders are nice and will last you a long time, these are cheap and easy to put together for someone on a budget.
    Last edited by Twise95; 09-25-2016 at 01:49 PM.
    Teddy Wise - Senior Moderator, NWFI

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  8. #8
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    Here's a couple pics of the ones I have made. The bolt holes are drilled and tapped to eliminate the nuts but pretty much the same thing CW built:



    Last edited by spactrukn; 09-25-2016 at 09:56 PM. Reason: Spelling
    -Ken

    Two fish swim into a concrete wall... One looks to the other and says " Dam!"

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