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Thread: Cured Eggs - the right way

  1. #1

    Default Cured Eggs - the right way

    I'm always happy when the cure hits the eggs with perfection. After 1 day of constant tumbling I remove some air and turn the bad for 2 more days. The eggs suck everything back in and as you can see in the pictures - almost self vacuume packs it self. These will fish next year!






  2. #2
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    Yum, I'd eat that ><,>
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  3. #3
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    Looks good. I cure eggs the same way.

  4. #4
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    Looks good, I always toss 'em in glass jars before the freezer. You stick with the bags?
    "Chuck Norris talks in the fourth person"

  5. #5

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    they stay in bags. I take them fishing in bags as well. once done I rinse and reuse if the bag has no holes. seems to work great.

  6. #6

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    Looks good, how are you guys storing your eggs? I've always freezed mine, but was told there is not need to. Just stick them in the fridge. So I tried that this year with some springer eggs. They stayed good for months, but now have grown mold. Anyone ever have a problem with this, or know what happened? Will eggs always grow mold when storing in the fridge for long periods of time?
    NW Steelheaders - Sandy River Chapter

  7. #7
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    Unless you have unhospitable conditions mold and bacteria will grow. Getting either salt, sugar, or another preservative in high enough concentration to be unhospitable means high likelihood of a rather destroyed skein (Borax is a skirt around this with the old "packed in borax" method).
    Lowering exposure during the process (clean and dry area, no wind, etcetera) should help minimize, but will still likely happen.

    Fortunately for us, Salmon and steelhead are given WAY too much credit, and you can probably just remove the moldy portions and they will still work.

    I freeze mine in part because a large portion of the cures I use for chinook and coho will destroy a jar of eggs left in the fridge for more than a few weeks. They are quite firm when the cure is done with little to no juice, but after a few weeks will be soft and tons of juice in the jar - so I have to freeze and take out a few jars at a time to not have to throw a bunch away every few weeks.
    Last edited by Osmosis; 11-21-2016 at 12:36 PM.
    "Chuck Norris talks in the fourth person"

  8. #8

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    Freeze them and they will fish fine. Like Alan said - those slimy noids don't need that much credit. Last year I pulled eggs covered in freezer burn from the bottom of the freezer and went to town on fall salmon with them. They were at least 3yrs old.

    Think about how many cures and methods of curing, storing, rigging, source of fresh eggs, etc. there are and they ALL CATCH FISH. So at the end of the day as long as you do an OK job you will catch fish. my 2c.

  9. #9

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    Thanks fellas.......

    My plan was to clean off the mold and use them anyway. I've caught fish on some pretty nasty borax eggs before, so I'm sure these will work just fine.
    NW Steelheaders - Sandy River Chapter

  10. #10

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    I've had eggs grow mold on the top of the jar. I chucked the moldy layer and caught fish with the rest of them. As long as they're not rancid you should be good to go. I've put eggs in my bait fridge at the end of fall chinook season (November) and then broke them out the following summer chinook season (July) 8-9 months later and those worked too. I'm gonna have to agree with Alan that people give them way too much credit!

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